CANADIAN MOTION PICTURE DISTRIBUTORS ASSOCIATION

ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DES DISTRIBUTEURS DE FILMS

 

ANTI-PIRACY OPERATIONS | DIVISION DES ENQUÊTES

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 19, 2005                 

                                                                                               

TORONTO POLICE RAID ILLEGAL

MOVIE STREET VENDORS

Two Days of Raids Yield over 12,000 pirated DVDs

 

Toronto- Law enforcement, assisted by Anti-Piracy Operations of the CMPDA, last week conducted raids in multiple locations across Toronto.  Over the course of two days, officials targeted street vendors and a local flea market, resulting in the seizure of more than 12,000 pirated DVDs and the arrests of 10 individuals, 2 of which were young offenders..

 

“We applaud the Toronto authorities for their swift action in shutting down these illegal movie vendors,” said MPA Chairman and CEO Dan Glickman.  “Pirate DVD operations like this can’t get away with profiting off other people’s copyrights and we are glad that the Canadian authorities have been cracking down on these kinds of counterfeit operations almost weekly.”

 

On October 11, Toronto Police Service (32 Division) assisted by the Anti-Piracy Operations of the CMPDA, raided seven locations at the Downsview Flea Market in North York (Toronto) where individuals were illegally selling counterfeit DVDs.  Police arrested ten people and seized more then 11,000 pirated DVDs.  

 

In addition, authorities seized several televisions, DVD players, a computer and an unspecified amount of cash.  The individuals arrested were taken to 32 Division  and charged under the Criminal Code for “Fraud over $5000”, “Fraud under $5000” and “Possession of Property Obtained by Crime.”

 

On October 11 and 12, Toronto Police Service (14 Division), which covers part of Chinatown, seized over 1,200 pirated DVDs from street vendors who ran off at the sight of police. The majority of individuals selling pirated DVDs are minors (under 18).  Police say these minors are being recruited in schoolyards. No arrests were made and charges are still pending.

 

The Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. (MPAA) estimates that the movie industry lost up to $3.5 billion in 2004 to physical piracy worldwide.  A Smith Barney study stated that in 2004, the industry lost $5.4 billion including Internet piracy.

 

 

About the MPA:  The Motion Picture Association (MPA) represents the interests of major motion picture companies in the global marketplace. On behalf of its Member Companies, the MPA conducts investigations around the world, assists with the criminal and civil litigation generated by such cases, and conducts education outreach programs to teach movie fans around the world about the harmful effects of piracy. The MPA directs its worldwide anti-piracy operations from its headquarters based in Encino, California and has regional offices located in Brussels (Europe, Middle East and Africa), Mexico City (Latin America), Montreal (Canada) and Hong Kong (Asia-Pacific). The MPA’s anti-piracy activities have helped to transform entire markets from pirate to legitimate, benefiting video distributors, retailers, and foreign and local filmmakers alike. The MPA Member Companies include: Buena Vista International, Inc.; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Paramount Pictures Corporation; Sony Pictures Releasing International Corporation; Twentieth Century Fox International Corporation; Universal International Films, Inc.; and Warner Bros. Pictures International, a division of Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.

 

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For more information please contact:

 

MPA Montreal

Gary Osmond

(450) 672-1990

 

MPAA Los Angeles

Kori Bernards 

(818) 995-6600

 

MPAA Washington, DC

Gayle Osterberg

(202) 293-1966